“Threat” Assessment

accuScreenshot of a local weather alert

So we in California are enduring the worst drought in 1,200 years. We are dying for rain. Yet when it finally, possibly, comes we term it a “threat”. Maybe I’m being overly picky here, but I’ve always been annoyed at weathermen’s rush to label anything outside of endless sun as bad.

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12 thoughts on ““Threat” Assessment

  1. Rain is scary. I can hear it pattering on the air conditioning housing. I’m still astounded at how short summer was (during April) and how we’re back to winter already.

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    • Yeah, the weather is acting kind of weird, isn’t it. The seasons seem shifted forward (leaf drop is getting later, as was the start of our milder winter). This rain, though, won’t do much unless we get a lot more.

      BTW, thanks for the comment. I’ve yet to figure out how to actually get people to do more than just hit the “like” button.

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      • I don’t know, either. I think the key may be the type of post. Write about something that compels people to speak. Sometimes my most heartfelt posts, 2500 words of hard work, those get barely passing mention. One guy likes it. Yay. Then I post something dumb like a post about beating wordpress with a wooden spoon, and that draws a dozen responses.

        Does that make sense? Not a whit.

        BTW, there was a cloudburst where the rain came down in buckets for about 30 seconds, then… nothing. Fah. California weather is bizarre.

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      • At the foot of the Los Padres National Forest, where I live, we also had about 30 second spate of rain, surrounded by hours of sprinkles. Down the road about a mile or so and on into town no rain at all. Go figure.

        Typos courtesy of my speaking into a cell phone!

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      • I like the SLO region. I used to go up there for the ren faire in July, and a few years back went horse camping at Los Osos. I see that you have hiked all the interesting peaks sticking up around there– I’ve always been fascinated by them. They’re interesting looking.

        The rain thing is an anomaly. It’s been promising for 2 days, and then it’s just a little nothing rain storm. Threat. 😀

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      • Many years ago I was part of a little dance troupe at the renaissance faire. Some people really get into it, seem to lose touch with reality a bit.

        Yes I love hiking here. But I’m feeling the itch to travel; got a list of places in mind. Just have to get to where I can afford it.

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      • There’s a germ of a blog post right there.

        I’ve been to Europe and most of the western US. But I’m not sure my trip to Europe really counts.

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  2. I’ve been to Tijuana and Hawaii. Hiked to the top of Kilauea. Walked through steaming fumaroles high as myself. Camped out over night on K’s hot, hard surface, the odor of sulfuric acid strong in my nostrils. But that’s about it. I’m overdue.

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    • You like hiking hills/mountains then? I’ve a young boy who likes rocks, and we’re trying to incorporate that into the overall camping thing. We went to Calico hills and brought back many colorful rocks, and it made the hiking about more purposeful, sort of. We’re also contemplating gold mining up in the sierras. There’s got to be a ton of gold up there.

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      • My assumption is the easy Sierran gold is pretty much played out. Deep below the surface, though, I’ll bet is a ton of it. But these are just hunches.

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      • If I could just get back there with heavy machinery, we could do it like the Yukon and strip mine the area. It’s not like anyone is using the Sierras for anything useful, anyway. ;D (I’m a little stunned by the extant of what they did up on the Klondike back at the turn of the century, and are still doing. Check out Google maps on this:
        Dawson, YT
        Canada
        64.038681, -139.304783

        All that for gold. I think those are all tailings.

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      • Yep. I used to live in gold country. Lots of ruined hillsides laid waste by giant hoses. It was the ethic of the day. Logging too. Yosemite was on its way to one big clearcut. Thankfully John Muir And Teddy Roosevelt came along. Unfortunately the bad guys haven’t gone away, and every generation has had to fight these battles anew.
        Yesterday’s Gifford Pinshot and James Watt is today almost an entire political party. ~ Later edit: reference to a particular party removed (at this time). Will expand upon in a subsequent post at some point.

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